Biggest Little City
  • Rainbow  by Sb Sullivan
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    Desert Rainbow

    Photo Credit: Sb Sullivan

  • 2
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    Couple sitting at Wingfield Park

    Photo Credit: Darron Birgenheier

  • Nala
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    Service Dog, Nala, at the Truckee River

    Photo Credit: Timothy Conzachi

What are Historic Resources? Historic Resources are like living objects require a thoughtful care and maintenance to enjoy long useful life. Each resource is a reflection of specific time in history. A collection of these specific resources can begin to define a period’s social, stylistic, cultural, and economic heritage. The historic buildings, sites, districts, and objects of a place, weave together to form a fabric that connects different generations. Through thoughtful preservation of these important resources, the past can be preserved as a vital and functioning part of present day life. (City of Reno Historic Structures Handbook) 

Why Preserve "Old Buildings"? Our city's historic structures--homes, businesses, commercial buildings, and schools-- provide a direct link to the past through their associations with the important people, events, and architectural movements of the past. These "old buildings" reflect the character and values of the people who shaped our city and made it into the unique place that it is today. Historic structures add to the value and character of their surroundings. They are non-renewable resources----once they have been altered from their original state, including the surrounding visual landscape, they lose their historical value. In order to maintain the value of historic buildings and to preserve them for future generations, it is necessary to take deliberate measures to ensure their continued survival.

Everything You Wanted to Know About Historic Register (PDF)

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